2012/01/19

「科学者はジャーナリズムをわかっていない」on The Guardian

ジャーナリストによる科学報道に対する代表的な批判に対して、Ananyo Bhattacharyaが「科学者の言うとおりにしたら、ほとんど誰も記事を読まなくなるのだ」と対抗する記事を書いた
The standard structure of news stories doesn't work for science
標準的なニュース記事の構成は、科学についてはうまくいかない


There's been some shrewd criticism of the "inverted pyramid" model of writing news but there's a reason we stick to it doggedly. It works. Some readers come to news sites wanting a quick hit. Others want to know more about each story. The 'inverted pyramid' – essentially presenting the new results at the top then filling in the background – can satisfy both camps if it is done well. Those who suggest otherwise should look at their blogposts and work out how far down the page most of their readers get. They may be surprised.

ニュース記事執筆の"逆ピラミッドのモデルについて、かの鋭い批判がなされているが、我々は断固としてそれに固執する理由がある。これはうまくいっく。ある読者たちは一通りのことを迅速に知るために、ニュースサイトにやってくる。また別の読者たちは個々のストーリーを知るためにやってくる。逆ピラミッド、すなわち、最初に本質的な新結果を提示し、背景を書いていくという形が、うまくやれば、両方の人々の要望を満たすことになる。逆順にすべきだと言う人は、自分のブログ記事を見て、大半の読者がどこまでたどりつくか見てみればいい。驚くことだろう。


The internet doesn't have word limits. Why do you?
インターネットは文字数制限がない。


"On the web, real estate is endless and cheap" so why on earth do the press keep producing 300-700 word news stories and paring down scientists' quotes to a sentence or just a few choice words? There are two main reasons. The first is respect for the readership. Editors want readers to return to their site and read their content. We don't want to bore them. Every sentence in a story, every word, is weighed and if it is found wanting, it is cut. The second reason is resources. A news story needs to be commissioned, written, edited and subbed. This takes time. If you double the length of every news story you publish, you effectively halve the number of stories you can cover – or worse, you halve the amount of time spent getting the story right in the first place.

「ウェブ上では、データ量に限りはなく、かつ安い」のに、報道機関は300〜700語の記事を書いて、科学者の一文か数語の発言を引用するだけなのか。それには大きくは2つの理由がある。ひとつは読者への配慮だ。編集者は読者に何度でもサイトを訪れて、コンテンツを読んでもらいたがっている。我々は読者をうんざりさせたくない。記事のすべての文、すべての単語は計量され、不足ならカットされる。2つのめの理由はリソースだ。記事は依頼され、執筆され、編集され、整理される。これには時間がかかる。発行する記事の量が2倍になれば、読者が読める記事の数が半減してしまう。あるいはもっと悪くて、まずもって記事に辿り着くまでに多くの時間が必要になる。

Your headline is hyperbolic
見出しが誇張されている


The purpose of a headline is not to tell the story. That's the purpose of the story. The purpose of the headline is to pique the interest of readers without lying. So the next time a multi-squillion pound experiment reports evidence of neutrinos going faster than the speed of light, don't expect the headlines to say "Astonishing but esoteric particle physics finding likely to be flawed though no one can see how yet".

見出しの目的は記事の内容を語ることではない。それは記事自体の目的だ。見出しの目的は、嘘をつかずに読者の興味を惹くことだ。次に巨大な実験装置で超高速ニュートリノの証拠が報道されるときにも、「驚くべきだが、難解な素粒子物理の発見は、誰もがまだどうなっているかわかっていないが、おそらく誤りだと見られる」という見出しを期待しないでほしい、


Change my colourful quote at once!
発言そのままに書くな


No. Quotes serve many functions in a news story but one important reason they're there is to inject some humanity into the piece. Most scientists are human and, thankfully, don't speak in the arid tone that characterises an academic paper. They get excited and say things like "If we do not have causality, we are buggered" and "I don't like to sound hyperbolic, but I think the word 'seismic' is likely to apply to this paper". That's nothing to be ashamed of. It is no secret that reporters go fishing for a good quote. That's nothing to be ashamed of either.

ニュース記事における引用には奥の機能があるが、その重要な一つは、記事に人間味を加えることである。ほとんどの科学者は人間であり、ありがたいことに学術論文を特徴づける無味乾燥な言葉では話さない。彼らは興奮していて「これに因果関係がないなら驚くよ」とか「誇張はしたくないが、この論文には驚天動地というのが似合いの言葉だ」といった感じで話す。別にこれを恥じることはない。そして記者も相応しい引用をすべく話を聞きに行っているのは秘密でもなんでもない。こちらも恥じることはない。


Why did you emphasise the 'tabloid' implications of my work?
どうして、私の研究のタブロイドな応用を強調するのか?


There's a fundamental misapprehension among many in the scientific community that the principal job of science journalists is to communicate the results of their work to the general public. It's not. A journalist might emphasise one part of the research and ignore other parts altogether in an effort to contextualise the story for their readers. That does not, of course, justify spinning the story out of all recognition so that it fundamentally misrepresents the work.

「科学ジャーナリストの仕事は、科学者の成果を一般人に伝えるものだ」という根本的な誤解が科学界に広くある。そうではないのだ。ジャーナリストは、読者のためにストーリーを作り上げる過程で、研究のある部分だけを強調し、他を無視することがあるかもしれない。もちろん、そのことは、研究成果を根本的に間違って伝えるように誘導することを正当化するものではない。


The story didn't contain this or that 'essential' caveat
記事には重要な注意事項が書かれていない


Was the caveat really essential to someone's understanding of the story? Are you sure? In my experience, it's rare that it is. Research papers contain all the caveats that are essential for a complete understanding of the science. They are also seldom read. Even by scientists.

その注意事項は誰かが記事を理解するために、本当に不可欠なことだろうか。私の経験では、そんなことはほとんどない。研究論文には、科学を完全に理解するために不可欠な注意事項がすべて書かれている。しかし、それがすべて読まれることはまずない。科学者たちによってさえも。


You can't cover my work. I forbid it
ジャーナリストにはこの研究はわからないから、記事にするな


A scientist presents their work at a conference or deposits it in a pre-print archive but then insists that reporters should not cover it. The edict is often issued as a result of fears that coverage of the work would jeopardise subsequent publication: some journals (including Nature) have a strict embargo policy that forbids reporting of a piece of research before a specified time. Embargoes do pose a problem for journalists interested in producing timely coverage of science – even though on closer inspection the fears often prove to be unfounded.

But it's worth stating that while no one can force a scientist to talk to a reporter about their work, no one can force a journalist not to report something that is in the public domain – even if they are reporting your work and you have refused to speak to them.


科学者は研究成果を学会で発表し、プレプリントアーカイブに置くが、ジャーナリストには報道するなと言う。これは多くの場合、出版を危うくするという懸念から出ており、Natureなど一部の学術誌は指定期間内の研究論文の報道を厳格に禁じている。タイムリーに科学記事を書こうとするジャーナリストにとって、このようなルールは問題になる。しかし、よく調べても、そのような懸念に根拠はない。

しかし、誰にも科学者に対して記者に自分の研究を語らせる権利はないが、ジャーナリストに対してパブリックドメインなものの報道を禁じる権利もない。たとえ、ジャーナリストが自分の研究成果を報道していて、自分がジャーナリストに語るのを拒否していたとしても。


How could you quote that person who disagrees with me? He's wrong!
私の研究成果を認めない者の発言を何故、引用するのか。彼は間違っている


I hate the straw-manning engendered by the "he says, she says" mode of journalism. But the findings of science are often hotly contested and often wrong. In many cases, journalists uncover flaws in the research while calling independent sources to pull their story together. At Nature, a significant number of news stories are dropped after enquiries because they turn out to be weaker than the abstract or the press release suggested. For the stories that get through, the journalistic process may expose more problems or disagreements that were not caught when the paper was peer-reviewed. If the criticisms seem valid and are not easily rebutted, then journalists have a duty to represent them.

「彼が言った。彼女が言った」という方式のジャ−ナリズムによって生じる藁人形を私は嫌っている。しかし、科学の発見は多くの場合、論争を呼び、しばしば間違っている。多くの場合、ジャーナリストは、元ネタとは独立のソースを並べることで、研究の誤りを見つける。Natureでは、非常に多くのニュース記事が問い合わせ後に破棄される。というのは、Abstractやプレスリリースから読み取れるよりも、実際は"弱い"ことが明らかになったからだ。記事を書く過程で、ジャーナリズムのプロセスにおいて、論文査読のときに見つからなかった多くの問題や意見の相違が明らかになる可能性がある。研究成果に対する批判が有効で、簡単に反駁できない場合は、ジャーナリストにはそれらを提示する義務がある。

The story contained an error or errors
記事には誤りがある


It is worth remembering that while a paper represents months or years of work to the scientist concerned, the reporter or editor responsible is likely to have dealt with a dozen or more similar gems in the same week. One scientist's heinous press bungle looks like a difference of opinion to another. Nonetheless, if there's a genuine factual error in a news story it should be corrected and a note posted with it to acknowledge the error. Journalism is fast-paced and even with the best fact-checking practices, there's room for errors to creep in. Everyone makes mistakes from time to time …

論文は当該の科学者が数か月あるいは数年かけた結果だが、記者や編集者は同じ週のうちに数十個以上の同様のネタに対処していることを知っておく必要がある。ひとりの科学者にとっての、報道のひどい不手際も、他からは意見の相違にしか見えない。しかしながら、ニュース記事の真の事実誤認があれば、それは修正され、誤りがあったことを明記されなければならない。ジャーナリズムは速度優先であり、最良のファクトチェックを実践しても、誤りが入り込む余地がある。誰もが日々、誤りを犯す。

[Ananyo Bhattacharya: "Nine ways scientists demonstrate they don't understand journalism" (2012/01/17) on The Guardian]
読者に読まれるように書くことで、結果として科学研究の報道にありがちなことを起こしていて、それを避けようとすると誰も読まなくなるという。

ただ、大量に流れてくるeurekalertScienceDailyのRSSあるいは、一般向け科学雑誌NewScientistLiveScienceのTweetから読む記事を選択する際には、結局のところキャッチィな見出しに頼らざるを得ないというのも現実。

posted by Kumicit at 2012/01/19 04:32 | Comment(0) | TrackBack(0) | Skeptic | このブログの読者になる | 更新情報をチェックする
この記事へのコメント
コメントを書く
お名前:

メールアドレス:

ホームページアドレス:

コメント: [必須入力]


この記事へのトラックバック
×

この広告は180日以上新しい記事の投稿がないブログに表示されております。